A First Aid Kit for Cross Stitch

Tell your friends ! Pin on PinterestShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on StumbleUponShare on FacebookEmail this to someone

 

It’s happened far too often. I have time to stitch away from home and I find I am missing a needle. Or my only needle breaks. Or I find I don’t have my chart. One time, I had my chart, floss, needle, scissors, and reading glasses. What I didn’t have was my fabric.

Last weekend I drove about a half hour from home to stitch with friends and realized I didn’t have my readers. Had I been any closer, I would have gone back to get them. Fortunately for me, someone in the group had an extra pair. We all have stories to share about that time we didn’t get to stitch because something was missing.

I remembered I had an extra first aid kit that was no longer needed. Hmmm. I decided to make a first aid kit for cross stitch.

A first aid zippered container that was no longer in use is perfect. Turn it just right and the band-aids look like a cross stitch! Cute, yes?

A first aid zippered container that was no longer in use is perfect. Turn it just right and the band-aids look like a cross stitch! Cute, yes?

The best part of this project will be in its preventive value. Now that I will have one of everything in a nice, neat case in my car, I will probably never need it. That’s just the way it goes. But that’s not necessarily a bad thing, right?

Using a case intended for an actual first aid kit is not essential. Any container that will stay closed and fit easily in the glove box or console will do. My choice says more about my sense of humor than anything else.

It was easy to decide what to put in it … one each of every item I didn’t have when I needed it at some time in the past.

Needles of various sizes
Floss
Pearl cotton
Flower thread
Fabric in various counts
Highlighter
Sponge in a water tight container
Post-it notes and a pencil for just in case
A simple chart
Small scissors (not necessarily “good” ones … they are for emergency use after all)

Deciding what to include was easy ... everything I had ever forgotten at some time in the last 40 years!

Deciding what to include was easy … everything I had ever forgotten at some time in the last 40 years!

The pearl cotton is included so I can practice pulled thread stitches. The flower thread is for those times I am stranded with a non-stitcher who wants to learn. (I find it’s easiest to teach when the learner doesn’t have to deal with multiple strands.) The dry sponge, ready to be dampened, in the re-purposed film canister is my go-to stitching aid to prevent tangles and knots.

Ready for the next cross stitch emergency!

Ready for the next cross stitch emergency!

I added a couple of small pieces of linen from my stash, an easy single-color snowflake chart, and over-dyed floss for said snowflake for that time I may forget everything. You can get that freebie snowflake chart in my easy ornament post.

And, of course, a cheap pair of readers.

x x x x x x x x x x

Like me on Facebook!

 

 

Posted in Editorial | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments Off on A First Aid Kit for Cross Stitch

The Work of My Hands

Tell your friends ! Pin on PinterestShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on StumbleUponShare on FacebookEmail this to someone

 

My love of teaching comes from a love of sharing. Once I learn something and find joy in it, I want everyone else in the world to know that joy. And so I became a needlework teacher. Of course, sharing is a two-way street. I learn as much from my students as they learn from me.

I also learn from the needlework teachers I have met along my journey. And when I get to teach at a retreat with others, there’s just a whole lot of sharing going on!

I’m looking forward to the Work of My Hands Retreat, a weekend of being immersed in whitework. I get to share. I get to teach. I get to learn from my students and I get to learn from Terri Bay.

Terri Bay is an extraordinary teacher of Hardanger and other forms of whitework. I am fortunate to be teaching with her at the Work of My Hands Retreat. Terri will be teaching Ukrainian whitework embroidery. She designed “St Paul Snowflake” as an introduction to this beautifully elegant form of needlework. Satin stitches, several types of eyelets, hemstitching and a unique little stitch roughly translated as “Topwinder” are featured in this project.

St Paul Snowflake is an introduction to Ukrainian whitework embroidery, designed and taught by Terri Bay.

St Paul Snowflake is an introduction to Ukrainian whitework embroidery, designed and taught by Terri Bay.

My project is a whitework sampler in that it features a sampling of stitches typical to whitework. There are filling stitches, pulled stitches, satin stitch variations and is generally a collection of stitches that I think are pretty.

"The Work of My Hands" includes a dozen traditional whitework stitches.

“The Work of My Hands” includes a dozen traditional whitework stitches.

When Terri and I got our heads together to plan this weekend we decided that our goal would be to simply pamper the 24 attendees. We chose the historic Brookstown Inn, a lovely small hotel located in a refurbished 1837 mill as our host site. We decided that we would limit class size to 12 so that everyone could learn in a relaxed atmosphere. We decided that each class would be an all-day class with relaxation breaks.  We decided to include all meals in the package so that we could continue to enjoy the classroom camaraderie into the evening.

We love the elegant simplicity and focus on comfort you will find at The Brookstown Inn.

We love the elegant simplicity and focus on comfort you will find at The Brookstown Inn.

We also decided to add a day before the retreat so that everyone will have settled in on Thursday evening and be ready for class on Friday morning. On Thursday afternoon, we’ll tour The Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts (we call it MESDA) and have dinner at Salem Tavern, located in the heart of the restored town of Salem. (MESDA and Salem Tavern are included in the three-day package price.)

We'll "sup" at Salem Tavern located on the quaint Main Street of Salem, a restored Moravian settlement.

We’ll “sup” at Salem Tavern located on the quaint Main Street of Salem, a restored Moravian settlement.

This is not to be a hustle-and-bustle, try-to-fit-everything-in type of weekend that requires a vacation day when you get back home. This is to be a very deep breath, a very satisfying sigh type of retreat.

We hope you will join us. We want to share with you!

Details are available by writing to me at jeanfarish@gmail.com or you can find the event on the Stitchers’ Escapes Facebook page.

The Work of My Hands Retreat
July 7-10
Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Three-Day Retreat Including Hotel Accommodations:
$625 per person, double occupancy*

Three-Day Retreat Without Hotel Accommodations
$440

Two-Day Retreat Including Hotel Accommodations
$495 per person, double occupancy*

Two-Day Retreat Without Hotel Accommodations
$375

*All rooms in our block at The Brookstown Inn feature two double beds. If you plan to attend alone, as a couple or with a non-stitching companion, please contact me for pricing.

 

 

Posted in tutorial | Comments Off on The Work of My Hands